All posts by charlescearl

Data scientist at Automattic.com.

BooksinclusionSocial Justice

Aspiring towards anti-racism

The Atlantic magazine posted an a day ago article “We’re All Tired of Being Called Racists”. The article presented views of some supporters of the current (as of August 1, 2019) U.S. president at a recent rally. Many were perplexed at being labeled “racist”.

One of those interviewed in the piece insisted that they couldn’t be racist because their children were of mixed race. Yet Strom Thurmond — one of the U.S.’s most virulent segregationists of the 20th century — had an African American daughter Essie Mae Washington-Williams. Eduard Bloch was a Jewish Austrian doctor protected from anti-Semitic terror for a number of years during the 1930’s — a lone act of compassion during the anschluss. There are many cruel contradictions in this landscape.

Strict definitions of what racism is and isn’t aren’t fluid enough deal with the capacities that we each have for compassion and prejudice. Showing compassion for a daughter when enacting so many repressive laws doesn’t seem an acceptable bar. Yet, don’t we all deserve a path to redemption.

It seems so much easier and just to think in terms of allow all of us to escape binary traps, to aspire to, and ultimately attain some better version of ourselves and our society.

I think that this quote from Dr. Ibram X. Kendi is spot on when he writes:

No one becomes ‘not racist,’ despite a tendency by Americans to identify themselves that way. We can only strive to be antiracist on a daily basis, to continually rededicate ourselves to the lifelong task of overcoming our country’s racist heritage. We need to read books that force us to confront our self-serving beliefs and make us aware that ‘I’m not racist’ is a slogan of denial.

We can each actively aspire to be the anti-racist. Some first steps could include:

If all else fails, think in terms of how the children of one hundred years from now will judge you, and then work backwards.

AIConferencesinclusion

Black In AI paper submission deadline extended

The Black in AI is a workshop that centers the work of Black AI researchers and practitioners from across the globe. The paper submission deadline for the 2019 workshop has been extended to August 7. This is it’s third year.

I’d encourage submission even (especially!!) if your research and ideas are still coming together. There are a limited number of travel grants available which you can apply for here. You don’t have to have an accepted paper to apply for the travel grant.

A/B testingAlgorithmsData Science

Christo Wilson Discusses the Ethics of Online Behavioral Experiments

If your company runs A/B tests involving it’s user community, this talk is a must see. Christo Wilson at Northeastern University discusses an analysis his lab ran on how companies use the Optimizely platform to conduct online experiments. Although these experiments tend to mostly be innocuous, there’s a tremendous need for transparency and mechanisms for accountability. How is your company addressing this?

Data for Breakfast

On May 1 of 2019, Dr. Christo Wilson gave a talk on his investigation into online behavioral experiments. The talk was based on a piper entitled Who’s the Guinea Pig? Investigating Online A/B/n Tests in-the-Wild, which he and his students gave at the 2019 ACM Conference on Fairness, Accountability, and Transparency in Atlanta, Georgia.

Online behavioral experiments (OBEs) are studies (aka A/B/n tests) that people conduct on websites to gain insight into their users’ preferences. Users typically aren’t asked for consent and these studies are typically benign. Typically an OBE will explore questions such as whether changing the background color influences how the user interacts with the site or whether the user is more likely to read an article if the font is slightly larger.

Sometimes, these studies cross ethical boundaries. For example, Facebook conducted an ethically problematic experiment designed to manipulate the emotional state of its users

View original post 948 more words

HistoryPoliticsTravel

Remembering Madiba in Cuba

Nelson Madela — affectionately known as Madiba — would have been 101 today. His impact on the world will be felt for generations to come and we can only guess how his life will ultimately guide our concept of leadership, the struggle for decency and humanity in the centuries to come. South Africa’s gift to humanity is that it is now a blueprint for what a multi-racial democracy should be. That it’s people was able to isolate and remove an anti-democracy president in the years since Madiba is a testament to how firmly it has taken root — the Economist ranks South Africa 40th in the world in terms of the health of democracy (another southern African country Mauritius scores significantly above the U.S.)

A year ago, we visited the Africa House in Havana, where there was an exhibit that explored Madiba’s connection to Cuba. I thought I would share some photos from our time there.

Today the United States is becoming again one of those countries spawns people like Madiba — people who are it’s soul, it’s children, it’s essence, for whom there is no alternative but to speak out, to act, to agitate, to transgress, to take back their humanity. Not because they hate it, because their life is the embodiment of the prayer and dream for what that place could be.

If you are a U.S. citizen and are Black, from Indian subcontinent, from the Caribbean, have ancestors who speak Spanish, are from the peoples who settled here 20,000 years ago, or one of the 100 million “marginalized” people of the country who are being told to “go back”, remember Madiba, remember Harriet Tubman, remember the Sudanese who are fearlessly standing up to bring freedom to their country. Remember that people like you were the reason that a semblance real democracy came to the United States in the first place. Remember that you birthed it in Wounded Knee and Selma. Be the beacon, be the light.

Lastly, there is something significant in Madiba’s structuring of the freedom struggle in South Africa as a collective movement of and for the people as opposed to a cult of personality centering the movement leader. It was hard not to think that through looking at the photo of Madiba and Fidel Castro. But it also is a lesson that freedom should not and cannot be delegated to a political party or it’s leaders, and that conversely tyranny is systemic (look beyond the MAGA hats). I end with a quote from Angela Davis

Even as Nelson Mandela always insisted that his accomplishments were collective—also achieved by the men and women who were his comrades—the media attempted to sanctify him as a heroic individual. A similar process has attempted to dissociate Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. from the vast numbers of women and men who constituted the very heart of the mid-twentieth-century US freedom movement. It is essential to resist the depiction of history as the work of heroic individuals in order for people today to recognize their potential agency as a part of an ever-expanding community of struggle.

From an interview published at The Nation, https://www.thenation.com/article/qa-angela-davis-black-power-feminism-and-prison-industrial-complex/
AIAlgorithms

Gödel, Incompleteness and Privacy

Avi Wigderson has a nice talk on how Kurt Gödel’s incompleteness theorems bound what can and cannot be computed (or proved) by simple programs.

In this recent post I talked about how Gödel’s theorem was used to show that for certain kinds of learning algorithms, we can’t know definitively whether the algorithm learns the right thing or not. This is kind of equivalent to saying that we can’t definitively know whether there will be a gap in the program’s learning.

The flip side of this, as Wigderson points out, is that it is probably a good thing that there are certain things that are too hard for a program to figure out. This hardness is the key to privacy — the harder it is to decipher an encrypted message, the more you can have confidence in keeping the message content private. This principle is at the core of what allows e-commerce.

Perhaps there is a way to structure our online communications or transactions so that learning our behavior — in pernicious ways — becomes impossibly hard. This might diffuse a lot of the emerging fears surrounding AI.

Wigderson makes his point — what he calls the “Unreasonable usefulness of hard problems” — about 30 minutes into the talk.

Check out the “Unreasonable usefulness of hard problems” 30 minutes in.
AISocial Justice

Which cities use facial recognition?

San Francisco famously banned the use of facial recognition by police and other municipal authorities on May 14th of this year. Citizens in Detroit angered by the use of facial recognition in Project Green Light forced a moratorium on its use. Although Orlando has halted for an immediate deployment, a trial is being conducted involving police officers only. According to the Natalie Bednarz, the Digital Communications Supervisor in the Orlando office of Communications and Neighborhood Relations

if the City of Orlando Police Department decides to ultimately implement official use of the technology, City staff would explore procurement and develop a policy governing the technology

Email communication from the Orlando office of Communications and Neighborhood Relations

This report by Georgetown Law School reports that Chicago uses facial recognition in policing and throughout its mass transit systems.

Beyond surveillance cameras, several cities have been forced by ICE to turn over drivers license photos to ICE’s facial recognition software to identify persons who are not U.S. citizens. Not only is facial recognition software notoriously bad at identifying faces of African Americans, but systems score poorly in identifying people who identify ethnically as Latinx.

The Georgetown Law School in 2016 put together a list of city and state governments across the U.S. that use facial recognition.

Should facial recognition be banned altogether in policing?

AIinclusionData Science

Black In AI workshop call for papers

If you are a student, researcher, or professor at a Historically Black College or University and work actively in data science, machine learning, or artificial intelligence, please consider submitting a paper to the 2019 Black in AI workshop. The deadline is now August 7 — I’d encourage submission even (especially!!) if your research and ideas are still coming together. There are also travel grants available and I’ll post that application soon.

The workshop occurs during the 2019 neurlps conference (this is probably the most attending conference on deep learning and other AI architectures). The specific goal of the workshop is to encourage involvement of people from Africa and the African diaspora in the AI field, and to promote research that benefits (and does no harm to) the global Black community.

Paper submission extended deadline: Tue August 7, 2019 11:00 PM UTC

Submit at: https://cmt3.research.microsoft.com/BLACKINAI2019

The site will start accepting submissions on July 7th.

No extensions will be offered for submissions.

We invite submissions for the Third Black in AI Workshop (co-located with NeurIPS). We welcome research work in artificial intelligence, computational neuroscience, and its applications. These include, but are not limited to, deep learning,  knowledge reasoning, machine learning, multi-agent systems, statistical reasoning, theory, computer vision, natural language processing, robotics, as well as applications of AI to other domains such as health and education, and submissions concerning fairness, ethics, and transparency in AI. 

Papers may introduce new theory, methodology, applications or product demonstrations. 

We also welcome position papers that synthesize existing work, identify future directions, or inform on neglected/abandoned areas where AI could be impactful. Examples are work on AI & Arts, AI & Policy, etc.

Submission will fall into one of these 4 tracks:

  1. Machine learning Algorithms
  2. Applications of AI 
  3. Position papers
  4. Product demonstrations

Work may be previously published, completed, or ongoing. The workshop will not publish proceedings. We encourage all Black researchers in areas related to AI to submit their work. They need not to be first author of the work.

Formatting instructions

All submissions must be in PDF format. Submissions are limited to two content pages, including all figures and tables. An additional page containing only references is allowed. Submissions should be in a single column, typeset using 11-point or larger fonts and have at least 1-inch margin all around. Submissions that do not follow these guidelines risk being rejected without consideration of their merits. 

Double-blinded reviews

Submissions will be peer-reviewed by at least 2 reviewers, in addition to an area chair. The reviewing process will be double-blinded at the level of the reviewers. As an author, you are responsible for anonymizing your submission. In particular, you should not include author names, author affiliations, or acknowledgements in your submission and you should avoid providing any other identifying information.

Travel grants

Use this link to apply for travel grants to the conference. They are available for eligible attendees, and should be submitted by  Wed July 31, 2019 11:00 PM UTC at the latest (Note that this is one day after the paper submission deadline).

Content guidelines

Submissions must state the research problem, motivation, and contribution. Submissions must be self-contained and include all figures, tables, and references. 

Here are a set of good sample papers from 2017: sample papers 

Questions? Contact us at bai2019@blackinai.org.