Category: inclusion

AIData Scienceinclusion

Black In AI workshop call for papers

If you are a student, researcher, or professor at a Historically Black College or University and work actively in data science, machine learning, or artificial intelligence, please consider submitting a paper to the 2019 Black in AI workshop. The deadline is July 30 — I’d encourage submission even (especially!!) if your research and ideas are still coming together. There are also travel grants available and I’ll post that application soon.

The workshop occurs during the 2019 neurlps conference (this is probably the most attending conference on deep learning and other AI architectures). The specific goal of the workshop is to encourage involvement of people from Africa and the African diaspora in the AI field, and to promote research that benefits (and does no harm to) the global Black community.

I’ll include below the call for papers below.

And if you want to know more about data science with Black people in mind, I’m giving away two books on the subject! You can click this link or this one to claim one of them if you like.

Here’s the annoucement

Paper submission deadline: Tue July 30, 2019 11:00 PM UTC

Submit at: https://cmt3.research.microsoft.com/BLACKINAI2019

The site will start accepting submissions on July 7th.

No extensions will be offered for submissions.

We invite submissions for the Third Black in AI Workshop (co-located with NeurIPS). We welcome research work in artificial intelligence, computational neuroscience, and its applications. These include, but are not limited to, deep learning,  knowledge reasoning, machine learning, multi-agent systems, statistical reasoning, theory, computer vision, natural language processing, robotics, as well as applications of AI to other domains such as health and education, and submissions concerning fairness, ethics, and transparency in AI. 

Papers may introduce new theory, methodology, applications or product demonstrations. 

We also welcome position papers that synthesize existing work, identify future directions, or inform on neglected/abandoned areas where AI could be impactful. Examples are work on AI & Arts, AI & Policy, etc.

Submission will fall into one of these 4 tracks:

  1. Machine learning Algorithms
  2. Applications of AI 
  3. Position papers
  4. Product demonstrations

Work may be previously published, completed, or ongoing. The workshop will not publish proceedings. We encourage all Black researchers in areas related to AI to submit their work. They need not to be first author of the work.

Formatting instructions

All submissions must be in PDF format. Submissions are limited to two content pages, including all figures and tables. An additional page containing only references is allowed. Submissions should be in a single column, typeset using 11-point or larger fonts and have at least 1-inch margin all around. Submissions that do not follow these guidelines risk being rejected without consideration of their merits. 

Double-blinded reviews

Submissions will be peer-reviewed by at least 2 reviewers, in addition to an area chair. The reviewing process will be double-blinded at the level of the reviewers. As an author, you are responsible for anonymizing your submission. In particular, you should not include author names, author affiliations, or acknowledgements in your submission and you should avoid providing any other identifying information.

Travel grants

Use this link to apply for travel grants to the conference. They are available for eligible attendees, and should be submitted by  Wed July 31, 2019 11:00 PM UTC at the latest (Note that this is one day after the paper submission deadline).

Content guidelines

Submissions must state the research problem, motivation, and contribution. Submissions must be self-contained and include all figures, tables, and references. 

Here are a set of good sample papers from 2017: sample papers 

Questions? Contact us at bai2019@blackinai.org.

inclusionPoliticsSocial JusticeTravel

Cuba as a prayer to inclusion

As the current administration of the U.S. continues to place restrictions on travel to Cuba, my heart aches, and my mind goes to back to amazing days that we spent in Havana and Trinidad last summer.

A year later, impressions remain with me. Walking the streets of Habana and Trinidad, one is left optimistic on what inclusion could be. As we traveled across half the island, and from one end of Habana to the other, I was struct by the absence of the “Black ghettos” — the all too familiar racial segregation that is imprinted on each and every U.S. city that I have ever visited.

I was struct by the fact that the resources, though humble, were shared by all across gender and color. People of different hues and ages did Tai Chi in the park. Occasional people on the street made sarcastic comments on the Castros or Trump, the bureaucratic inefficiencies, the resources constrained by the embargo.

But the generosities were unparalleled. The warmth is still in my heart.

Along the roads, I was struct by the absence of police. Or rather it was the absence of omnipresent force — of the signals that lethal violence is around the corner, trained on Black bodies. The occasional officer, there to mitigate traffic issues, no military grade automatic weapons, that’s what I needed for a vacation.

Seeing people with access to a basic burial, children able to attend a dance class without their parents having to defer due to money, people with access to a simple loaf of bread regardless of the meager cash on hand.

We saw families coming together to say their goodbyes.

I cannot unsee inclusion, I cannot unsee the basic respect for basic human dignity. I cannot unsee humanity in practice.

I hope that you visit soon.

inclusionInspiration

Solace from New Zealand

The bravery of New Zealand in confronting pain and loss, in embracing its Muslim community, in confronting white supremacy is like an opening for humanity to move forward.

This photo.

https://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2019/03/photos-mourning-new-zealand/585304/#img02

This moment of a worshipper at Kilbirnie Masjid embracing New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern is the essence of all that we need to start.

That the divisions between Islam, Zoroastrianism, the Jain faith, Judaism, the Sikh faith, Hinduism, the Bahai faith, Yoruba spirituality, and yes Christianity in its many forms — they are illusory veils that separate us from each other. We can transcend veils.

That we need an end to violence.

That its time for more women to lead, because the corruption of patriarchy is hopefully now laid bare.

That the color of your skin, or the languages you speak, don’t make you any less human and deserving of love, humanity, compassion, equality.

That would be a Surrender to peace.

Here is the thought experiment that I can’t get out of my head — what if a country of 300+ million on the North American continent were to ban male presidents — just for a decade — and see what that does for the collective mental and emotional? What if it were to embrace its Muslim community, open its doors to the oppressed as it claims to, recognize the humanity of its original inhabits, and of all of its spectrum of citizens. That would be an amazing balm to the world.

AtlantainclusionSocial Justice

Avondale Estates is having a backlash

Martin Luther King feared fully expected that there would be a backlash as basic human rights for African Americans expanded. There were historic precedents for this such as the reversal of post-Civil War Reconstruction-era freedoms during the last decades of the 19th century and the rise of segregationist laws throughout the southern US during the 1950s. Ta-Nahesi Coates speaks eloquently on the last incarnation of this in his Atlantic piece The First White President.

I am witnessing the evolution of this fourth backlash wave play out where I live, just east of Atlanta. Yesterday, my family and I witnessed the incident which is the featured image of this post. A White police officer handcuffs, and humiliates a young Black man about 15 feet from us through the window of a shop were we frequently have a relaxed brunch. The shop, I should mention is owned by a Black woman, also a resident of Avondale Estates. I should have stood with my young Brother and recorded the incident — sadly I know that life will give me other opportunities. To witness is a powerful comfort and statement. The young man showed calm and grace, as many of us have learned to do in such situations (I’ve been there).

Avondale Estates, a little east of Atlanta until recently had de-facto housing segregation through special real estate covenants. The history of housing segregation in Georgia, and the Atlanta area is both fascinating and frightening. If you zoom in on the Avondale Estates area, you’ll notice interesting racial disparities. There’s more information in this 50-year look back at the fair housing act.

Avondale Estates and the small towns to it’s north and east have been notorious for the disproportionate amount of revenue garnered from African Americans being stopped for minor traffic violations.

fining_cities

Georgia cities — especially Stone Mountain and Clarkston lead the nation in the fining of Black people

I wish we knew more, but like it’s voting transparency, information on racism in policing in Georgia is hard to come by.

Although one of my close friends (also African American) purchased a home in Avondale Estates in the ’90s, anecdotally (just from informal conversation), the number racialized policing and other incidents around exclusion have continued to grow.

I’ll detail one particular issue I’ve encountered. In Avondale, several times when walking while Black, my family and I have encountered on several occasions the question “Do you live around here?” Word of caution and advice for any (non-Black) person with the bad home training to ask this question. The 14th amendment of the Constitution of the United States is generally understood as guaranteeing access to the public roads to any US citizen, “green card” holder, or basically any human being regardless of what they look like. Dear White People, it’s not your militia/Klan duty to keep American or Avondale Estates or any other space in this country White. There’s my peculiar rant.

What can done? A few suggestions:

  • Check out the hash tag #StopRacialProfilingAvondaleEstatesGA
  • When you see these incidents going down, use your phone and record.
  • Start demanding accountability from your police officers, city and county representatives.
  • Talk to your children about race, about racial profiling, about racialized violence.

Let’s end the police state together.

 

AtlantaBooksinclusionMigrationWriting

Gayatri interviews Yuyi Morales at Decatur Book Festival

My partner Dr Gayatri Sethi is interviewing celebrated writer and illustrator Yuyi Morales today at the Decatur Book Festival today, Saturday, September 1 from 1:00 to 1:30. They’ll be discussing Morales’ new book Dreamers.

Isn’t it time you talked to your children about what is going on at the border? Dreamers talks about Morales’s own 1994 journey from Xalapa, Mexico to the US. with her child. It is such a beautifully illustrated book, and a profound story with so many layers.

If you’re in looking to add a highlight to your long weekend, please come through!

AIHistorically Black Collegesinclusion

AI at HBCUs Fall 2018

If you teach/study computer science at a Historically Black College or University, or know of someone who does, please check out and pass along the site https://charlescearl.github.io/ai-hbcu/.

I put it up a year or so ago to document the work being done at those institutions to increase the impact and participation of the African Diaspora in shaping the way that AI technologies are developed and used. As this recent report by the ACLU points out, yes algorithmic racism is still a thing.

If you know of important initiatives, interesting classes, or discussions going on at HBCUs around this issue, please feel empowered to check out the repository https://github.com/charlescearl/ai-hbcu and send a pull request. Or drop a comment below.

I was encouraged to see that the Neural Information Processing conference (one of the most attended AI conferences) is taking steps towards inclusion. They keep promising to change their name.

 

 

 

inclusionSocial Justice

Investing in empowerment

Dr King spent his last precious hours advocating for the economic rights of African American sanitation workers in Memphis. In his broader vision, this was one arm of a struggle for justice for the poor and powerless that spanned divides of gender and race.

I recently met Ryan Harrison at the Conference on Fairness, Accountability, and
Transparency  and he shared his amazing post on socially responsible or as he puts it solidarity based investing.

The post, at least for me, presents a new way of thinking about “return on investment”. In other words, the “return” is the uplift and empowerment of our communities in ways that seek to build equity for all instead of maximal profits for a few.

In our brief conversation, Ryan schooled me on bail bonds funds as one example. Since many people can’t afford the bond for minor traffic violations and misdemeanors, they end up having to do jail time, miss work, lose jobs, and thus end up in a downward poverty spiral. Since it’s not supposed to be a crime to be Black, Brown and Poor, non-profit funds such as the Bronx Freedom Fund were setup to provide a route of this particular trap. An investment in the bail bond fund is a direct investment in the economic viability of a given community — like the South Bronx.

As Ryan points out, the move away from the traditional 401k/IRA can be gradual — say 10% of your investment funds allocated to solidarity investments. It is the start of the journey that matters.

The options for where to put your solidarity dollars range from grant based investing (like bail bond funds or in local food cooperatives like the one in the featured image by Steven) to direct lending programs (like Canopy Coop in Boston) to more traditional equity investments like the Shared Capital Cooperative .

Gayatri Sethi (my life partner) is working on a education platform called Alt-College that’s based on this solidarity model.

Do you have any suggestions on efforts to invest in? Strategies that you have put into place for socially conscious investing? Please share!