Programming

Adapting to the Kinesis keyboard

I ordered a Kinesis keyboard on joining Automattic, figuring that I would try to kick the new year off taking ergonomics seriously. It feels like I have so far gone through two periods of learning, and still getting with respect to matching the rate of touch typing on Mac laptop keyboard.

The first phase was rough, feeling like a basic hunt and peck. I’d quickly get frustrated and go back to the laptop keyboard, or the small Mac wireless silver keyboard. So somewhere between one and two hours a day. That phase was from late February until say around first week in March. I took a couple weeks break out of frustration and then picked up last week in March.

Phase II seemed remarkably better, much faster touch  typing to the point of being relaxed and less having to think about where the keys are. The challenge so far seems to be around getting into the zone as far as emacs keys are concerned. That is, the META- and CONTROL keys still present a problem for me, and it still seems a bit weird in terms of the Mac key mapping for the kinesis (I’m using Advantage ). Having the the CONTROL key be right next to either thumb seems like the more appropriate mapping to have. I still haven’t quite figured out how to deal with numbers effectively. Strangely enough, it almost seems like although I’m creating globs of floats everyday, most of those are generated by the machine.

The real issue is having faster access to the numeric operators, parens, brackets. So maybe the next goal is to work on those python and scala typing drills eh?

LispProgramming

Clojure and Lisp

I suspect that Clojure, event though acknowledge to be the latest incarnation of the common lisp family of languages, is less powerful than Common Lisp. I suspect that this has a lot to do with macro processing, the fact that it is a JVM language.

Is it worth pursuing to any degree? How would one go about firming such a claim, and to whom would it matter?

Writing

Writing for 10 minutes a day

I wanted to get back in the habit of writing, or writing with focus and intent about ideas. For ten minutes a day. The habit of creating and actually reflecting upon ideas. So here goes into an ocean of anything.

I was thinking about how there are trends that seem to emerge, first as a low hum and then somehow are established, and then arrive as phenomena that shape history. I’ve seen these earthquakes of thought roll up in countless ways. In the technology world this seems to happen in ways that are so pronounced, perhaps because they become so intwined in commerce, society, and culture: email, twitter, Internet search. It feels that bitcoin has reached that point with the observation that there is now an “economy”: a significant pool of people worldwide whose lives and livelihood revolve around it.

The trouble is, that once you’ve realized that wave has reached the beach, what next?